I haven’t done a weekly roundup in a while and I’m off to work shortly. This seems like an ideal opportunity to resurrect it…

I haven’t written a weekly roundup since Oct 3rd so this should offer a fair amount. There were certainly many reviews for 148Apps but I’ll leave you to find those.

It looks like the past few weeks have been all about Resolution and rightly so really!

First up was my preview of Gears of War 3 from when I had a chance to play it at the Eurogamer Expo at the start of the month.

Typically Gears of War multiplayer has always been a solid affair offering testosterone-fuelled chaos and the all too satisfying chainsaw kill, so how about trying it from the other perspective? That’s what Gears of War 3’s beast mode is all about and it’s damn good fun from what I’ve seen.

Full preview

Then there was a review of Lara Croft and The Guardian of Light for VideogameUK. Excellent game.

Lara Croft and The Guardian of Light is not like any other Tomb Raider game. This much is clear right from the beginning, and the lack of Tomb Raider in the title is quite a clear sign too. No, this is Lara Croft and an altogether different beast. It’s a formula that ensures that the latest instalment in Lara Croft’s life is one of the most entertaining chapters in recent years.

Full review

Following that was a review of Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock for Resolution. Not bad at all.

A Quest mode in Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock? What madness is this, you may well ask. I certainly did when I first heard about it. It sounded bizarre to offer a storyline to the likes of Guitar Hero. When it comes to Warriors of Rock, well, yes it is quite bizarre frankly. But it also works and makes for a much more interesting single player experience than previously seen in other rhythm based games. Throw in the ever strong multiplayer functionality and revamped Quickplay mode, and Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock is a thoroughly solid package.

Full review

Then there was my review of Final Fantasy XIV for play.tm.

It’s notoriously difficult to review an MMO at any stage in its lifespan. Two weeks after its release, you’re opening yourself up to a tirade of complaints that you reviewed the game too early on to be accurate. Wait a few months and no one really cares what you think. Even worse, all it takes is one patch and everything you just wrote about is made redundant. An MMO is organic in its evolution, ever changing, often completely different by the end of its life compared to where it was at the beginning. Just look at the changes to Star Wars: Galaxies for example, once hugely popular, its changes are now considered a huge mistake. So, where to start with Final Fantasy XIV? Somewhat predictably it does offer potential but currently it all feels more like a work in progress than a complete article. While it’s fine to have an MMO with plenty of growth potential, this one feels overly lacking in early content to make it worthwhile of a purchase just yet.

Full review

Change of pace time, I wrote a round up of Hidden Object games for the PC. Oi, don’t turn your nose up at them.

Casual gaming and in particular, hidden object games are probably a bit of a strange and foreign land for those reading this. I’m assuming you’re the stereotypical gamer, one who knows what they like and is pretty informed when it comes to all things gaming related. However there are still many people who don’t really have much experience in gaming, or simply like a slower paced game. Enter the hidden object genre, a game that the CoD addict might turn their nose up, but that still has its place in the world. I’ll admit it now, I quite like them. They’re simple and are the modern day equivalent of the puzzle books I used to take with me on long journeys. Crucially for the purpose of this article, they potentially make a fantastic inexpensive present for that relative you’re desperate to introduce gaming to. So, without further ado, a brief round up on the selection provided. It’s worth noting that they were also tested on a 50something year old, just to cover a wide spectrum of different players.

Full review

Finally, a review of Wiiware game Robox.

Upon first loading Robox, I instantly thought of Wall-E. The tale of the poor little robotic probe wandering around a strange world by itself is kind of like Wall-E. Ok, possibly not quite but I never saw the film, only the trailer. Robox has more in common with the Metroid series instead offering platforming and side shooting galore. For the most part, it works well, but there’s still that certain something that holds me back from recommending it.

Full review

Blog a Day 296of365: Weekly roundup